Unsafe Blood Sugar Levels

Blood sugar refers to the amount of sugar–or glucose–in your blood. The hormone insulin helps the body process and use glucose. Normally, blood sugar increases after eating, and the pancreas releases insulin to regulate glucose levels. In people with diabetes (high blood sugar) or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), the body is not able to regulate blood sugar on its own, resulting in sometimes very dangerous reactions.

High Blood Sugar

High blood sugar occurs when there is not enough insulin produced, or when the body cannot properly process insulin. Blood sugar that remains high for a long time can cause serious damage to the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Some signs of high blood sugar include high blood glucose levels in a blood or urine test, frequent urination and an increase in thirst.

Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar can be caused by stress, hunger and insulin reactions. If you have been diagnosed with hypoglycemia or with diabetes, it is important to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia and to know how to treat this condition. Symptoms include shakiness and dizziness, sweating, severe feelings of hunger, sudden moodiness, lack of concentration and clumsiness.

Normal Levels of Blood Sugar

There are several types of blood glucose tests, which include fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar and random blood sugar testing. Fasting blood sugar tests measure glucose levels after 8 hours without food or drink and should result in a normal range of 70 to 99 milligrams glucose per deciliter of blood; postprandial blood sugar tests measure glucose levels within two hours after eating and should result in a range of 70 to 145 mg/dL; random blood sugar tests are taken at intervals throughout the day and should result in glucose levels of 70 to125 mg/dL. Blood sugar levels higher or lower than these ranges are not considered normal and should be monitored closely. Danger zones include fasting blood sugar above 126 mg/dl or below 50 mg/dl.

How to Fatten the Hips, Thighs & Butt

Getting rid of unwanted weight in the lower body is a challenging task for pear-shaped women. However, there are benefits to being pear-shaped. According to the International Journal of Obesity, people with added weight in the hips, thighs and butt actually have an extra line of defense against diabetes, heart disease and other obesity-related conditions. Now that you know the benefits of being bottom heavy, learn how to develop lower body muscles to have a more voluptuous bottom half.

Ride a Bike

  1. Ride a regular bike or an exercise bike at a speed of 15 miles per hour. Keep your legs moving continuously, so that you constantly engage the muscles in the legs. Do this for 20 to 25 minutes.
  2. Adjust the resistance on the regular bike or exercise bike so that it challenges the muscles in the lower body. If your regular bike does not have resistance levels, find a bike route or bike trail that has a variety of inclines and steep hills.
  3. Create an even more challenging workout by adding lightweight ankle weights towards the last 5 minutes of the workout. This will provide added resistance and further develop the lower body muscles.
  4. Cool down for 5 minutes after you complete this workout by riding the bike at a slow pace of 5 miles per hour. Thoroughly stretch your legs, buttocks and hamstrings for another 5 minutes after the workout. Complete this entire exercise routine three to four times a week.

Lower Body Sculpting

  1. Stand with your legs hip-width apart. Hold a 5-pound dumbbell on your right outer thigh.
  2. Stand straight and maintain your balance. With weight concentrated on the left side of the body, and the right leg slightly bent, move the right outer thigh outward, to the side of the body, about 12 to 15 inches. Once the leg reaches this position, hold for one second and take it back to starting position slowly, being careful to maintain your balance.
  3. Lift the right leg again and return to starting position. Complete 12 to 15 repetitions. Repeat this exercise on your left leg, completing 12 to 15 repetitions. Perform two sets of this exercise on each leg, for four complete sets. Do this exercise three to four times a week. If you have trouble maintaining your balance, grab a chair and place the opposing arm on the top of the chair for balance. Always keep your back straight and abdominal muscles pulled in tight.

Stair Climber

  1. Set the resistance level on the stair climber so that it provides your lower body with a challenging workout. The object of the stair climber is to sculpt your hips, thighs and butt by using a high resistance level. By continuously engaging these muscles, you will help to build these muscles so they become firmer and more developed.
  2. Work out on the stair climber for 20 minutes at a pace of one full step within three seconds. The slower movement provides added resistance and makes the muscles in the hip, thigh and butt area work harder.
  3. Stretch the muscles in the legs, thighs and butt for five minutes after your 20-minute step workout. This helps to prevent soreness the next day. Perform this exercise routine five days a week.